CBD Misconceptions

CBD Misconceptions 2018-11-02T12:24:57-04:00
CBD Misconceptions

CBD Misconceptions

With the growing awareness of CBD as a potential health aid there’s also been a proliferation of misconceptions. Find questions and responses to common misinformation.

It doesn’t get you high, but it’s causing quite a buzz among medical scientists and patients. The past year has seen a surge of interest in cannabidiol (CBD), a non-intoxicating Cannabidiol compound with significant therapeutic properties. Numerous commercial start-ups and internet retailers have jumped on the CBD bandwagon, touting CBD derived from industrial hemp as the next big thing, a miracle oil that can shrink tumors, quell seizures, and ease chronic pain—without making people feel “stoned.” But along with a growing awareness of cannabidiol as a potential health aid there has been a proliferation of misconceptions about CBD.

“CBD is medical. THC is recreational.” Project CBD receives many inquiries from around the world and oftentimes people say they are seeking “CBD, the medical part” of the plant, “not THC, the recreational part” that gets you high. Actually, THC, “The High Causer,” has awesome therapeutic properties. Scientists at the Scripps Research Center in San Diego reported that THC inhibits an enzyme implicated in the formation of beta-amyloid plaque, the hallmark of Alzheimer’s-related dementia. The federal government recognizes single-molecule THC (Marinol) as an anti-nausea compound and appetite booster, deeming it a Schedule III drug, a category reserved for medicinal substances with little abuse potential. But whole plant marijuana, the only natural source of THC, continues to be classified as a dangerous Schedule I drug with no medical value.

“THC is the bad cannabinoid. CBD is the good cannabinoid.” The drug warrior’s strategic retreat: Give ground on CBD while continuing to demonize THC. Diehard marijuana prohibitionists are exploiting the good news about CBD to further stigmatize high-THC Cannabidiol, casting tetrahydrocannabinol as the bad cannabinoid, whereas CBD is framed as the good cannabinoid. Why? Because CBD doesn’t make you high like THC does. Project CBD categorically rejects this moralistic, reefer madness dichotomy in favor of whole plant Cannabidiol therapeutics. (Read the foundational science paper: A Tale of Two Cannabinoids.)

“CBD is most effective without THC.” THC and CBD are the power couple of Cannabidiol compounds—they work best together. Scientific studies have established that CBD and THC interact synergistically to enhance each other’s therapeutic effects. British researchers have shown that CBD potentiates THC’s anti-inflammatory properties in an animal model of colitis. Scientists at the California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco determined that a combination of CBD and THC has a more potent anti-tumoral effect than either compound alone when tested on brain cancer and breast cancer cell lines. And extensive clinical research has demonstrated that CBD combined with THC is more beneficial for neuropathic pain than either compound as a single molecule.

“Single-molecule pharmaceuticals are superior to ‘crude’ whole plant medicinals.” According to the federal government, specific components of the marijuana plant (THC, CBD) have medical value, but the plant itself does not have medical value. Uncle Sam’s single-molecule blinders reflect a cultural and political bias that privileges Big Pharma products. Single-molecule medicine is the predominant corporate way, the FDA-approved way, but it’s not the only way, and it’s not necessarily the optimal way to benefit from Cannabidiol therapeutics. Cannabidiol contains several hundred compounds, including various flavonoids, aromatic terpenes, and many minor cannabinoids in addition to THC and CBD. Each of these compounds has specific healing attributes, but when combined they create what scientists refer to as a holistic “entourage effect,” so that the therapeutic impact of the whole plant is greater than the sum of its single-molecule parts. The Food and Drug Administration, however, isn’t in the business of approving plants as medicine. (See the scientific evidence.)

“Psychoactivity is inherently an adverse side effect.” According to politically correct drug war catechism, the marijuana high is an unwanted side effect. Big Pharma is keen on synthesizing medically active marijuana-like molecules that don’t make people high—although it’s not obvious why mild euphoric feelings are intrinsically negative for a sick person or a healthy person, for that matter. In ancient Greece, the word euphoria meant “having health,” a state of well-being. The euphoric qualities of Cannabidiol, far from being an unwholesome side effect, are deeply implicated in the therapeutic value of the plant. “We should be thinking of Cannabidiol as a medicine first,” said Dr. Tod Mikuriya, “that happens to have some psychoactive properties, as many medicines do, rather than as an intoxicant that happens to have a few therapeutic properties on the side.”

“CBD is legal in all 50 states.” Purveyors of imported, CBD-infused hemp oil claim it’s legal to market their wares anywhere in the United States as long as the oil contains less than 0.3 percent THC. Actually, it’s not so simple. Federal law prohibits U.S. farmers from growing hemp as a commercial crop, but the sale of imported, low-THC, industrial hemp products is permitted in the United States as long as these products are derived from the seed or stalk of the plant, not from the leaves and flowers. Here’s the catch: Cannabidiol can’t be pressed or extracted from hempseed. CBD can be extracted from the flower, leaves, and, only to a very minor extent, from the stalk of the hemp plant. Hemp oil start-ups lack credibility when they say their CBD comes from hempseed and stalk. Congress may soon vote to exempt industrial hemp and CBD from the definition of marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act. Such legislation would not be necessary if CBD derived from foreign-grown hemp was already legal throughout the United States. (Read more: Sourcing CBD: Marijuana, Industrial Hemp & the Vagaries of Federal Law)

“’CBD-only’ laws adequately serve the patient population.” Fifteen U.S. state legislatures have passed “CBD only” (or, more accurately, “low THC”) laws, and other states are poised to follow suit. Some states restrict the sources of CBD-rich products and specify the diseases for which CBD can be accessed; others do not. Ostensibly these laws allow the use of CBD-infused oil derived from hemp or Cannabidiol that measures less than 0.3 percent THC. But a CBD-rich remedy with little THC doesn’t work for everyone. Parents of epileptic children have found that adding some THC (or THCA, the raw unheated version of THC) helps with seizure control in many instances. For some epileptics, THC-dominant strains are more effective than CBD-rich products. The vast majority of patients are not well served by CBD-only laws. They need access to a broad spectrum of whole plant Cannabidiol remedies, not just the low THC medicine. One size doesn’t fit all with respect to Cannabidiol therapeutics, and neither does one compound or one product or one strain. (Read more: Prohibition’s Last Gasp: “CBD Only”)

“CBD is CBD—It doesn’t matter where it comes from.” Yes it does matter. The flower-tops and leaves of some industrial hemp strains may be a viable source of CBD (legal issues notwithstanding), but hemp is by no means an optimal source of cannabidiol. Industrial hemp typically contains far less cannabidiol than CBD-rich Cannabidiol. Huge amounts of industrial hemp are required to extract a small amount of CBD, thereby raising the risk of toxic contaminants because hemp is a “bio-accumulator” that draws heavy metals from the soil. Single-molecule CBD synthesized in a lab or extracted and refined from industrial hemp lacks critical medicinal terpenes and secondary cannabinoids found in Cannabidiol strains. These compounds interact with CBD and THC to enhance their therapeutic benefits.

QUESTIONS ABOUT HEALTH ISSUES? ASK OUR EXPERTS.

FREE CONSULTATIONS & EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS AVAILABLE.

ASK LORRAINE

Frequently asked questions

Dosage Guidelines 2018-11-02T12:05:57-04:00

Decide how you want to take Cannabidiol. Cannabidiol oil is available in sprays, capsules, edibles and other products.

Find your ratio. Cannabidiol products have varying amounts of CBD and THC. A high CBD or high THC product is not necessarily superior to a strain with a balanced ratio. Find the proper combination to optimize your therapeutic use of Cannabidiol.

Begin with a low dose especially if you have little or no experience with Cannabidiol.

Take a few small doses over the course of the day rather than one big dose.

Use the same dose and ratio for several days. Observe the effects and if necessary adjust the ratio or amount.

Don’t overdo it. “Less is more” is often the case with Cannabidiol therapeutics.

Be aware of possible side effects. Cannabidiol is a safe and forgiving medicine.
Depending upon delivery method and individual tolerance, it can amplify anxiety and mood disorders. Other possible side effects are dry mouth, dizziness and faintness.

Consult your health counselor. Proceed cautiously, especially if you have a history of alcohol or drug abuse, mental illness, or are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Find Your Ratio! 2018-11-02T12:07:41-04:00

Although banned by federal law, dosed Cannabidiol medicine is currently available in the form of concentrated oil extracts, infused sublingual sprays, capsules, edibles, and other products. Potent Cannabidiol oil extracts have varying ratios of CBD and THC that are calibrated to suit the needs and sensitivities of each patient.

For anxiety, depression, spasms, and pediatric seizure disorders, many patients initially find they do best with a moderate dose of a CBD-dominant remedy (a CBD:THC ratio of more than 10:1). But a low THC remedy, while not intoxicating, is not necessarily the best therapeutic option. A combination of CBD and THC will likely have a greater therapeutic effect for a wider range of conditions than CBD or THC alone. For cancer, neurological disease, and many other ailments, patients may benefit from a balanced ratio of CBD and THC.  Extensive clinical research has shown that a 1:1 CBD:THC ratio is effective for neuropathic pain. Optimizing one’s therapeutic use of Cannabidiol may entail a careful, step-by-step process, whereby a patient starts with small doses of a non-intoxicating CBD-rich remedy, observes the results, and gradually increases the amount of THC.

In essence, the goal is to self-administer consistent, measurable doses of a CBD-rich remedy that includes as much THC as a person is comfortable with.

​The Biphasic Effect

Cannabidiol compounds have biphasic properties, which means that low and high doses of the same substance can produce opposite effects. Small doses of Cannabidiol tend to stimulate; large doses sedate. Too much THC, while not lethal, can amplify anxiety and mood disorders. CBD has no known adverse side effects at any dose, but drug interactions can be problematic. An excessive amount of CBD could be less effective therapeutically than a moderate dose. “Less is more” is often the case with respect to Cannabidiol therapy.

“Dosage is everything”—Paracelsus

Cannabidiol Dosing 2018-11-02T12:08:09-04:00

Cannabidiol therapeutics is personalized medicine. The right treatment regimen depends on the person and condition being treated. For maximum therapeutic benefit, choose Cannabidiol products that include both cannabidiol (CBD), a non-intoxicating compound, and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of Cannabidiol. CBD and THC interact to enhance each other’s therapeutic effects. They work best together. A patient’s sensitivity to THC is a key factor to determining the ratio and dosage of CBD-rich medicine. Many people enjoy the Cannabidiol high and can consume reasonable doses of any Cannabidiol product without feeling too high or dysphoric. Others find THC unpleasant. CBD can lessen or neutralize the intoxicating effects of THC. So a greater ratio of CBD-to-THC means less of a “high.”

What is CBD 2018-11-02T12:08:29-04:00

CBD is one of over 60 compounds found in Cannabidiol that belong to a class of ingredients called cannabinoids. Until recently, THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) was getting most of the attention because it’s the ingredient in Cannabidiol that produces mind-altering effects in users, but CBD is also present in high concentrations — and the medical world is realizing that its list of medical benefits continues to grow.

CBD is the major nonpsychoactive component of Cannabidiol sativa. According to a 2013 study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, CBD benefits including acting in some experimental models as an anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, antiemetic, anxiolytic and antipsychotic agent, and is therefore a potential medicine for the treatment of neuroinflammation, epilepsy, oxidative injury, vomiting and nausea, anxiety and schizophrenia.

10% Discount
20% Discount
30% Discount
10% Discount
20% Discount
No Prize
10% Discount
Almost!
10% Discount
20% Discount
No luck today
10% Discount
Get your chance to win a price!
Enter your email address and spin the wheel. This is your chance to win amazing discounts!
Our in-house rules:
  • One game per user
  • Cheaters will be disqualified.